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Spookover events at the Deering Estate (FL)

Florida delegate of the Paranormal Consortium

The Wagner Homestead
LPI Florida - April 2008
The history of the Wagner Homestead started with William Wagner who was born on an immigrant ship on the Hudson River in New York. William’s parents were both German immigrants from Bern. Much of his early life is unknown other than the first records where William volunteered with the United States Army on May 18, 1846 in New York city at the outbreak of the Mexican War. During this war William got injured in the battle of Cerro Gordo which was not serious but was haunting him when he became older. During several war’s William enlisted as volunteer and the Second Seminole War brought him finally to Miami area, which was not named at that time. William Wagner arrived in Miami in 1855 as storekeeper for the Army in Fort Dallas. According Maude Wagner her grandfather was a baker when he worked at Fort Dallas suttle store. Two years later William Wagner built the Wagner Homestead and is now known as the oldest surviving house in Miami. The building was moved in 1978, to its current location in Lummus park, to make space for the Miami-Dade metro rail system. The Wagner Homestead house was original located what is now N.W. 11th street and 7th Avenue.

William also built a mill at the Wagner creek near his house. The mill was used to produce flour from the root of a Cycad plant root known by the locals as Coonti. Wagner also built the first Catholic church in this region. The Wagner Homestead was built within a two acres orange grove.

William Wagner dies in 1901 at the house he built and where he lived a big part of his live. William is buried at the Miami Cemetery where also the grave of Jullia D. Tuttle can be found.

The records showing that the house was occupied until at least 1948 when Benjamin Cassell left the house. Benjamin was born in 1917 in the Wagner Homestead house and his father died of a heart attack while preparing to go to church.